Thursday, October 2, 2014

Grandpa Admiral Dewey Morris

I wanted to share my Grandpa Morris with you all today. I remember him quite well because I was a teenager when he passed. He was born in 1899 and died in 1968. Not a hugely long life as I am only a few years away from this age myself.

He used to come visit often as I was growing up and he was a quiet man who seemed to have a lot of patience as I recall. Our rambunctious ways did not seem to bother him and he would sit quietly and watch us play.

He was sick the whole time that I remember him and he used a cane to walk. His legs were so swollen near the end that he hobbled more than walked but he still made the trip to see up right up to the end. My Grandmother had died in 1954 so he was alone and I think he missed being around children. We were his grandchildren and brought smiles into his life and I am so glad that we did.
I remember well the day he died and laid in his house for 3 days so that all could visit. I was shocked to see nickels on his eyes when we went over and asked my Uncle Andy about them. Uncle Andy told me, that was for the ferryman to help the dead cross over. I was always intrigued by that idea and found out that was a long standing custom in the South but it actually is much older from Greek Times.

Here are a couple of stories I wrote about him after talking to W L Simmons at the Ebenezer Church Homecoming. I took notes and turned what he said into this story that I could keep for my family:-) Hope that you all enjoy getting to know Granddaddy Morris. I remember him best with a mess of fish like the picture and am thankful that he was here so that I could be. Love to all, Kimmee


Information from W.L Simmons at Ebenezer Church Homecoming--Sunday......July 2011

Grandpa Dewey had a store called "The Hinky Dink" located on Morristown Road about 1/2 mile from Aunt Elma's home. When Grandpa would go fishing, he would put big chains on the door to keep the children and Ola out of it. He did not want them taking any merchandise while he was fishing. When W L Simmons was a young man, he, Uncle Andy (Andrew Adair "tadpole") Morris and cousin Earl Morris used to go to Fred Hendrick's traveling wagon store. In those days you could sell a chicken or eggs for enough money to get a candy bar. They would take a chicken, collect the money, then while Mr Hendricks was distracted by the other two boys, W L would open the bottom of the chicken cage and act like he had another chicken to sell. The boys did this three times so that they could all have a candy bar. Years later W L felt bad about what he had done and one day he saw Mr Hendricks. They were just talking and Mr Hendricks asked "Was I a good supervisor?" and W L told Mr Hendricks "You were mean to me." Mr Hendricks had a shocked look and W L said, " Naw, you were a good one, but I have to tell you what we boys did to you when we were young." He then told Mr Hendricks the story of using the chicken three times and Mr Hendricks looked at him and said, "You'll boys didn't do that to me, did you?" W L had to tell him yes and that he was sorry. Mr Hendricks then forgave him and W L felt better about telling him.


Second story...At night when W L, Uncle Andy , and Earl would be coming home late down the trail to Grandpa Deweys store, Grandpa used to love to scare the boys. He used an old metal hat that he would rub on rocks, which produced a scary sound, all the while he was making terrible noises. The boys would say, "did you hear that?" they would listen for a while. Grandpa would do it again and the boys would be so scared that they would run the rest of the way home because it sounded as if someone was dying.


This is the way I remember him with a mess of catfish , ready for frying.

My grandparents wedding picture.. Grandpa Admiral Dewey and Grandma Ola Morris. They were 2nd cousins and there mothers were McCurdy Sisters..

My Great Grand Uncle Jesse Peacock.. Died in the First Battle of Manassas

Today on this day that we remember those that died in Battle, I want to remember my Great Grand Uncle Jesse C. Peacock. He was born in about 1837 and is shown on the 1850 Clark County census with his parents, Levi and Mary Elizabeth Bell Peacock. (my 2nd great Grandparents). He was 13 and living at home with this brothers and sisters.
We find him again in the 1860 Census at age 23 with his wife Nancy age 24, and their two children. A girl age 4 named Elizabeth and a boy age 9 months, named James. He named his daughter after his Mother. 
I am sure that times were hard then. The War was imminent and People were afraid that a way of life was changing. I wish I knew more of what life was for him in that year before he enlisted in the War. We find him registered for duty in the Conecuh Guards, Company E, Fourth Alabama Regiment from Riley’s History of Conecuh County, AL

Published 1881
Below is given a complete roll of this company, which was the first organized for the war in Conecuh.
 It was permanently organized at Sparta, Alabama, on the 1st day of April 1861; mustered at Sparta Depot, April 24th, 1861.
Just 3 short months later, he was killed and he left a widow with two small children at a time that food was scarce, and their money if they had any was worthless, and every one was losing the tiny living they eked out to others that came to claim it.
PEACOCK, Jesse, killed in first battle Manassas, July 21, 1861.
I often wonder if his Mother talked about her heritage or if she knew that she was Native American and of the Vann/Moytoy line.
I often think that this is the stock I come from and I can do anything because they could.
I honor him and all the fallen today and all those that still fall.. Love and light, Kimmee

 
Riley’s History of Conecuh County, AL
Published 1881
Pages 225-233
CONECUH GUARDS
COMPANY E, FOURTH ALABAMA REGIMENT
Below is given a complete roll of this company, which was the first organized for the war in Conecuh.
It was permanently organized at Sparta, Alabama, on the 1st day of April 1861; mustered at Sparta Depot, April 24th, 1861; received flag from the Ladies of the county; embarked on train with the following named commissioned, non-commissioned officers and privates; mustered into the Confederate States Army at Lynchburg, Virginia, May 7th, 1861; surrendered at Appomattox Court House, Virginia, April 9th, 1865:
BOWLES, P.D., captain; promoted major, August 22, 1861; lieutenant colonel, September 30, 1862; colonel, October 3, 1862; brigadier commander C.S.A., April 3, 1865.
LEE, William, promoted captain from 1st lieutenant, August 22, 1862; wounded at Gaines’ Farm, Virginia, 1862; killed at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 3, 1863.
McINNIS, Archibald D., promoted captain, from 1st lieutenant, July 3, 1863; retired from wounds received at first Manassas, July 1861, and at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 3, 1863, and at Cold Harbor, Virginia, 1864; died in Mobile, Alabama, since the war.
DARBY, James W., promoted captain, from 1st lieutenant, 1864; wounded at Gaines’ Farm, 1862; resides in Butler County, Alabama.
GUICE, John G., promoted 1st lieutenant, from 2nd lieutenant, August 22, 1862; wounded first battle Manassas, Virginia, July 21, 1861; wounded at Gaines’ Farm, Virginia, July, 1862; wounded in two places second battle Manassas, August, 1862, lost leg; honorably discharged; resides in Conecuh County, Alabama.
CHRISTIAN, Alfred, 1st lieutenant; wounded second battle Manassas, Virginia, August 1862; died in Conecuh County, Alabama since the war.
TRAVIS, Mark B., 2nd lieutenant; honorably discharged, April 1, 1861; died at Sparta, Alabama during the war.
TALIAFERRO, Charles T., 2nd lieutenant; resigned 1862; promoted to assistant surgeon 1862; promoted full surgeon Fourth Alabama Regiment, 1864; resides in Conecuh County, Alabama.
STEARNS, John S., 2nd lieutenant; wounded at Knoxville, Tennessee, November, 1863; wounded at Wilderness, Virginia, May 6, 1864; died at his home in 1880.
GATCH, Louis, 1st sergeant; killed first battle Manassas, Virginia, July 21, 1861.
GREEN, William, 1st sergeant; honorably discharged 1863, on election to Alabama Legislature; resides in Washington County, Alabama.
MOSLEY, Andrew J., 1st sergeant; wounded first battle Manassas in head and arm; wounded at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July, 1863; wounded at Chickamauga, Georgia, September, 1863; wounded at Spotsylvania Court House, Virginia, May 9, 1864; resides in Falls County, Texas.
DOWNS, George, 2nd sergeant; killed at Chickamauga, Georgia, September, 1863.
COTTON, James, 4th sergeant; taken prisoner at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania; remained in prison to the end of the war; died in the State of Texas since the war.
RICHEY, Robert, 3rd sergeant; killed at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July, 1863.
STINSON, Jasper Newton, promoted to color sergeant Fourth Alabama Regiment, July, 1862; killed at the second battle Manassas, August, 1862.
BOULWARE, Gil R., promoted to color sergeant Fourth Alabama Regiment; wounded at Fredericksburg, Virginia, September, 1862; wounded in side and arm, and right arm amputated, at Chickamauga, Georgia, September, 1863; resides in Conecuh County, Alabama.
SPENCE, Ingram, sergeant; recruited November, 1861; wounded at Knoxville, Tennessee, September 1863; resides in Conecuh County, Alabama.
CLARK, William D., sergeant; recruited November, 1861; wounded at Gaines’ Farm, July, 1862; wounded at Spotsylvania Court House, Virginia, May 10, 1864; resides in Conecuh County, Alabama.
DUNHAM, John Q., sergeant; wounded at Chickamauga, Georgia, September, 1863; died in Madison County, Florida, 1878.
ANDREWS, James M., sergeant; wounded first battle Manassas, Virginia; resides in Conecuh County, Alabama.
FLOYD, Alfred H., 2nd sergeant; recruited November, 1861; wounded at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania; July, 1863; wounded (lost leg) at Wilderness, Virginia, May 6, 1864; honorably discharged; resides in Texas.
STAHL, Louis, 3rd sergeant; wounded and arm resected at Petersburg, Virginia, October, 1864; resides in Marlin, Texas.
THOMAS, William, 1st corporal; killed first battle Manassas, Virginia, July 21, 1861.
BRILEY, Thomas, 1st corporal, killed at Chickamauga, Georgia, September, 1863.
RICHEY, James, 1st corporal; killed at Knoxville, Tennessee, October, 1863.
ROACH, Fred G., 2nd corporal; killed at Petersburg, Virginia, April 1, 1865.
CROSBY, William S., 1st corporal; resides in Conecuh County, Alabama.
THOMAS, Joseph A., 4th corporal; wounded first battle Manassas, Virginia, July 21, 1861; wounded at Eltham’s Landing, Virginia, April, 1862; wounded at Gaines’ Farm, Virginia, 1862; wounded at Fredericksburg, Virginia, 1863; wounded at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, 1863; resides in Conecuh County, Alabama.
ANDERSON, W.F., 2nd corporal; wounded at Fredericksburg, Virginia; died at Sparta, Alabama, since the war.
ROBERTSON, James, 3rd corporal; wounded in three places at Sharpsburg, Maryland, September, 1862; wounded at Wilderness, Virginia, May 6, 1864; resides in Conecuh County, Alabama.
ANDERSON, George, recruited in fall, 1861; killed battle Lookout Mountain, October, 1863.
AKERMAN, John, recruited January, 1865; wounded at Farmville, Virginia, on retreat from Petersburg; whereabouts unknown.
ALFORD, Artemus S., recruited January, 1865; resides in Texas.
BEARD, Blake, wounded first battle Manassas, and discharged (honorably); resides in Conecuh County, Alabama.
BONNETT, J.B., wounded first battle Manassas; discharged, 1862, (honorably); resides in Conecuh County, Alabama.
BETTS, Frank, returned home on sick furlough, and died in fall 1861.
BETTS, Ed., discharged in summer 1861; rejoined some other command and was killed in East Tennessee.
BLAKELY, G.W. discharged in fall 1861; run over and killed by cars since the war.
BOOKER, W.B., wounded at Chickamauga and disabled for life; resides in Conecuh County, Alabama.
BAGGETT, Richard, recruited in fall 1861, and died from sickness, in hospital, in the winter of same year.
BROWN, Julius, recruited in April, 1862; died from sickness, in the hospital at Charlottesville, Virginia, in the spring of 1862.
BROWN, Robert, recruited in April, 1862; died in hospital at Richmond, Virginia, from sickness.
BROWN, William, recruited November, 1861; deserted May 1, 1863.
BURK, William, recruited November, 1861; died in Montgomery County, Alabama, since the war.
CARTER, D.L., recruited in November, 1861; wounded at Suffolk, Virginia; resides in Conecuh County, Alabama.
COOPER, M.A., wounded at battle Wilderness, May 6, 1864; resides in the State of Texas.
CHAPMAN, Henry C., recruited March, 1864; wounded at battle Wilderness, May 6, 1864; placed on retired list; resides in Texas.
CURLEE, F.M., recruited November, 1861; wounded at Gettysburg; whereabouts unknown.
COLEMAN, Henry C., died at Richmond, June, 1862.
COLEMAN, William, recruited November, 1861; killed at battle Gettysburg, July 3, 1863.
CATO, A.J., recruited November, 1861; discharged for disability; resides in Texas.
DOWNS, Jerre, killed at battle Gaines’ Farm, July, 1862.
DANIELS, J.W., recruited 1862; wounded at Fort Harrison, 1864; resides in Conecuh County, Alabama.
DYAS, Thomas, taken prisoner at Knoxville, 1864; died in prison.
DuBOSE, James, killed at Chickamauga, September, 1863.
DEAN, Thomas, recruited November, 1861; deserted to the enemy at Strawberry Plains, Tennessee, 1863.
DOUGLAS, William, honorably discharged, July, 1862; residence unknown.
FOSS, Roderick, recruited March, 1864; wounded second battle Cold Harbor; resides in Alabama.
FORTNER, Richard, killed in skirmish below Richmond, January, 1865.
FLOYD, Charles, wounded at Gaines’ Farm, 1862; resides in Texas.
GARNER, Caleb, recruited April, 1862; killed at Gaines’ Farm, July, 1862.
GARNER, John, recruited April, 1862; killed at Gaines’ Farm, July, 1862.
GOLDSTEIN, Isadore, taken prisoner at Chickamauga; remained in prison until after the war; resides in Pennsylvania.
GANDY, Oxford, recruited November, 1861; honorably discharged July, 1862; resides in Conecuh County, Alabama.
GRICE, Francis M., recruited November, 1861; lost left arm at Gaines’ Farm; afterwards sutler Fourth Alabama Infantry; resides in Escambia County, Alabama.
GAFF, John, recruited November, 1861; killed at Gaines’ Farm, July, 1862.
HODO, John, recruited April, 1862; killed at Malvern Hill, 1862.
HUGHES, Daniel, honorably discharged August, 1861; died during the war.
HODGES, Dr. Elias O., promoted to assistant surgeon of a Virginia regiment, 1863; died in Texas since the war.
HODGES, William, wounded at Gaines’ Farm, July, 1862; taken prisoner at Lookout Mountain, 1863; died near Washington, Georgia, 1865.
HUDSON, Walker A., recruited April, 1862; taken prisoner at Hagerstown, Maryland, 1863; remained in prison during the war.
HIRSCHFELDER, Jacob, killed at Sharpsburg, Maryland, 1862.
HYDE, John D., recruited November, 1861; wounded at Gaines’ Farm, 1862, and at Chickamauga, September, 1863, and in skirmish below Richmond, 1864; resides in Conecuh County, Alabama.
HYDE, Joseph, recruited November, 1861; resides in Conecuh County, Alabama.
HENDERSON, William, resides in Georgia.
HASKINS, William, recruited April, 1862; killed at Petersburg, Virginia, 1864.
HASKINS, Isaac, recruited April, 1862; resides in Texas.
HORTON, William, wounded in shoulder and leg at Gaines’ Farm, July, 1862; resides in Butler County, Alabama.
JOHNSON, William W., wounded and disabled at Gaines’ Farm, 1862, and honorably discharged; resides in Conecuh County, Alabama.
JOHNSTON, Augustus, recruited March, 1864; killed at Wilderness, May 6, 1864.
JONES, E., recruited April, 1862; honorably discharged for sickness in 1862.
JOHNSTON, Emanuel, recruited November, 1861; killed at Malvern Hill, July, 1862.
KING, J.O., recruited November, 1861; discharged in the winter of 1861; resides in Butler County, Alabama.
KIRK, Frank, recruited November, 1861; honorably discharged; joined the Thirty-eighth Alabama Regiment; killed at Chickamauga, September, 1863.
LITTLE, J.H., resides in Texas.
LONG, William B. killed at Gettysburg, July, 1863.
LAMPKINS, Lindsey, died at Staunton, Virginia, July, 1863.
LYNCH, Fielding, recruited April, 1862; killed at Gaines’ Farm, July, 1862.
MATHEWS, William M., died in Conecuh County, Alabama since the war.
MERTINS, Julius A., recruited April, 1862, killed at Gaines’ Farm.
MOSLEY, Mason L., resides in Erath County, Texas.
MORRIS, Wiley, recruited in 1864; died in Conecuh since the war.
MORROW, William, wounded at the second battle Manassas, and wounded at Spotsylvania Court House, May, 1864; resides in Mobile County, Alabama.
MYERS, John, recruited November, 1861; wounded at Gaines’ Farm, July, 1862; dropped from the roll in 1863; killed in Butler County, Alabama, since the war.
MASON, John, wounded in first battle Manassas; dropped from the roll 1862; resides in Conecuh County, Alabama.
McMILLAN, C.C., furloughed in 1862, and transferred to another command; resides in Butler County, Alabama.
McIVER, Evander, wounded in two places first battle Manassas, and honorably discharged September, 1861; resides in Texas.
NICHOLS, W.H.H., deserted to enemy in front of Richmond, March, 1865.
NICHOLS, John, transferred from Finnegan’s Florida Regiment in the fall of 1864, and deserted to enemy before Richmond, March, 1865.
NASH, Samuel D., honorably discharged August, 1861; resides in Monroe County, Alabama.
OLIVIA, George, recruited November, 1861; honorably discharged August, 1862; died since the war.
PEACOCK, Jesse, killed in first battle Manassas, July 21, 1861.
PERRY, Frank, deserted November, 1863.
PERRY, Owen, wounded first battle Manassas, July 21, 1861, and honorably discharged; rejoined the army, was captured, and died in prison.
PERRY, Thomas, recruited May, 1864; wounded at Spotsylvania Court House, May, 1864; resides in Monroe County, Alabama.
PERRY, Theophilus, recruited May, 1864; residence unknown.
POWELL, Ephraim, killed second battle Cold Harbor, June 3, 1864.
PERRYMAN, James, honorably discharged January, 1862, and died in Conecuh County, Alabama, during the war.
QUINLEY, William, recruited April, 1862; wounded at Gaines’ Farm, July, 1862; and at Gettysburg, July 3, 1863; deserted to the enemy in 1865.
QUINLEY, Stephen, recruited March, 1863; wounded at Wilderness, May 6, 1864; resides in Texas.
RAY, Thomas E., recruited April, 1862; wounded at Sharpsburg, September, 1862; deserted to enemy 1864.
RUSSEL, David, honorably discharged December, 1861 for disability; resides in Louisiana.
ROSE, Robert, killed at Seven Pines, Virginia, May 31, 1862.
ROBBINS, John, killed first battle Manassas, July 21, 1861.
ROBBINS, Thomas, died from wounds received at Gaines’ Farm, July, 1862.
ROBERTSON, Thomas, killed second battle Manassas, August, 1862.
RITCHEY, Thomas, recruited April, 1862; died in the hospital at Richmond, August, 1862.
ROBINSON, J. Mat., honorably discharged for sickness, 1862; resides in Conecuh County, Alabama.
STEARNS, Henry C., wounded at Gaines’ Farm, July, 1862; resides in Conecuh County, Alabama.
STALLWORTH, Nick, wounded at Gaines’ Farm, July, 1862; honorably discharged 1862; resides in Conecuh County, Alabama.
STALLWORTH, W.L., honorably discharged June, 1861; for disability; resides in Conecuh County, Alabama.
SNOWDEN, Newton, killed at Wilderness, May 6, 1862.
SNOWDEN, William H., wounded in skirmish at Lenoir Station, Tennessee, December, 1863; honorably discharged for wounds received in 1863; resides in Conecuh County, Alabama.
SALTER, Mich B., wounded at Gaines’ Farm, July, 1862; wounded at Gettysburg, July 3, 1863, and right arm amputated; honorably discharged; resides in Conecuh County, Alabama.
STALLWORTH, Jos., killed second battle Manassas, August, 1862.
STUCKEY, Buck, wounded second battle Manassas, August, 1862; killed at battle Darbytown Road, September, 1864.
STUCKEY, John, wounded at ___________; resides in Conecuh County, Alabama.
STUCKEY, James, recruited November, 1861; resides in Monroe County, Alabama.
STRICKLAND, James, killed first Manassas, July 21, 1861.
SMITH, Jack, recruited November, 1861; honorably discharged for disability; resides in the State of Georgia.
SHAVER, John D., recruited April, 1862; killed at Chickamauga, September, 1863.
SHAVER, Phil. C., recruited April, 1862; resides in Conecuh County, Alabama.
SHEFFIELD, Evans, wounded at Gaines’ Farm, July, 1862; and at Gettysburg, July, 1863; killed by falling tree in Conecuh County, Alabama since the war.
SAMPEY, Francis M., wounded at second Manassas, August, 1862, and near Farmville, Virginia, April, 1865; died in Selma, Alabama, 1874.
SAMPEY, Greenberry G., recruited May 7, 1864; resides in Conecuh County, Alabama.
THOMAS, James H., wounded at Seven Pines, May 31, 1862; killed second battle Manassas, August, 1862.
THOMAS, James C., recruited November, 1861; killed at Sharpsburg, Maryland, September, 1862.
THOMAS, Henry C., recruited September, 1862; resides in Texas.
TURK, Theodosius, wounded at first Manassas; honorably discharged under act of Congress, 1862.
WHELAN, Pat. S., commissary sergeant Fourth Alabama; died at Sparta since the war.
WILSON, John W., recruited November, 1861; wounded at Cold Harbor, Virginia, June 3, 1864; resides in Conecuh County, Alabama.
WILSON, George, wounded at Spotsylvania Court House, May 8, 1864; residence unknown.
WILKINSON, Thomas, deserted March, 1862.
WIMBERLY, Dr. Samuel H., killed at first Manassas, July 21, 1861.
WILLIAMSON, John, recruited November, 1861; honorably discharged 1862; resides in Conecuh County, Alabama.
WILLIAMSON, James, recruited November, 1861; honorably discharged 1862 for disability; resides near Brooklyn, Alabama.
WATSON, Bailey, recruited November, 1861; taken prisoner 1864, and remained in prison until the end of the war; resides in Texas.
WOOD, Rev. George A., recruited November, 1861; wounded at Gettysburg, July 3, 1863; resides in Georgia.

Ole 100

Another memory of my precious Daddy....
Ole 100
Good morning sweet friends,
I don't know if I have shared with you all that we live near a train track now. Many people are put off by the sound of the train rolling down the track and the whistle that lets you know it's coming, but I love it..
It takes me right back to Century, Florida and the Alger Sullivan Company, that Daddy worked for all his life. He would sometimes have to go in to work on Saturday for one thing or another and amazingly, we (Donna and I) were allowed to go along.
The ole 100 was on the track out front. It gave us and every one in the area visions of how the lumber used to be delivered many years ago. It was our playground while Daddy did what he had to do, fixing some machinery that had gone bad on his day off or consulting with someone on what had to be done to fix whatever it was that had gone wrong.
Mind you, we were not irresponsible children and would never have harmed anything on that big ole Iron Horse but we made believe that we were the conductor of the train and going to see places far away. While he worked, we traveled. lol...
We would climb up on that black Horse and run to the Engineers cabin where you could see the pull for the train whistle, the place where the coal was shoveled in to keep it moving, and the old seat where the conductor could sit.
I was such a little girl when we used to do this, probably about 7 or 8 but I will always remember hanging my head out of the engine and dreaming about my hair blowing in the wind, as we rolled down the track.. lol. Donna and I would take turns being the engineer and we would hoop and holler like people did when they saw a train go by. So much fun and such great memories.
In the words of Johnny Cash, now when it starts down the track all I can hear is this song and all I can see are two little girls in our dresses climbing up on Old 100 to take a trip on Saturday:-) I hope that all of my wonderful family and friends enjoy this day as we did all those years ago.....
" I hear that train acoming, rolling round the bend, and I ain't seen the sunshine in . I don't know when".....
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N5Ts4M3irWM
http://www.northescambia.com/…/alger-sullivan-societys-old-…

A Beautiful Fall Day

Good Afternoon dear friends,
I was outside where it is so beautiful today and wanted to share the huge ruby red grapefruit that we will be ready to devour after first frost The tree is so full of fruit that the branches are almost touching the ground.. It is going to be so good and I can't wait until I can have one.

The tangerine tree has a few this year too. It is young so in the years to come will just have more and more until its branches are full also.

There is a beautiful vine covered in purple flowers over looking the fence that made me smile. I love anything to do with purple; I guess because my birthstone is that color:-) 

Then it started to sprinkle as the sun was shining and I heard Daddy's voice in my head saying.. "The Devil is beating his wife" and when the thunder was loud, " God is bowling"...
It was a sweet reminder that Daddy lives in me and it made me smile. I hope that all of you have a moment today that makes you smile. Maybe more than one.. Love you all, Kimmee

Red Clay Roads

Afternoon family and friends,
One of my cousins wrote about how dirt roads make her feel and a flood of memories came to me. I remember them so fondly growing up in Jay.

"My" road was named after my 2nd great Grandpappy but I did not know that as a kid.
Morristown Road was its name. It was a clay dirt road and when it rained , it became a gooey clay mess, that you had to drive down in the ruts to make it anywhere. If you got out of those ruts, you were going to have yourself a ride to remember.

Riding on the bus was an adventure on those days and I admired our bus driver, Raymond Diamond's, ability to keep it on the road and in between those huge ruts.
I think all of us kids on the bus held our breath and if truth be told, I think we hoped that the bus would get stuck, but only if we were going to school. LOL.

Raymond Diamond was one of the most caring people. Yes, he was our bus driver but he was also our protector and teacher. I think that is what makes for a good bus driver. Often times, especially these days, they are faced with discipline challenges and he met those with a firm hand and a kind smile. I never knew that he was my cousin growing up and that his Daddy, Bernie was too.
I went to Bernie's store every week to buy candy. It was 3 pieces for a penny and for 10 cents, I could have candy all day long. I bought Red Hots, Coconut sticks, Mary Janes, Bubble gum, Sugar Daddy Mini's and my favorite Bit of Honey.. Man, those were the days and candy has never tasted so good as it did then.

Sometimes Daddy would take us to the five and dime in town. That was a wonderland of toys, candy, household items and all kind of geegaws for a pittance. The bins were filled with things of wonder and I remember going up and down the aisles with my eyes as big as saucers wanting one of every thing I could see. There was a coke machine at the front and for a nickel you could get the coldest 6.5 oz coke in a bottle. Coke back then, burned a little when it went down. It wasn't all watered down like it is today. And it was good, so good.

Daddy worked so hard but he always gave us a dime if we needed it and when I got old enough, I started working in the cotton fields to get my "candy" money for the week.. Years later I still feel guilty that I worked in the fields for candy and the people that I worked alongside were working for food. I was a young kid and I did not know that people were hungry or that my Grandmothers own family had been hungry.

Daddy always made sure that we had shelter and food. He worked for such little money and although there were 6 kids, I don't ever remember needing something and not having it. Most of the time I had my wants too and that was a blessed way to grow up.

I am so thankful for the Raymonds, the Bernies, and the Bauldree fields which gave so many people jobs. One day remind me and I will tell you of my cotton field days in which I learned about humanity. Of course at 10, I did not understand, but today I do...
I hope that you all have dirt road memories. Love to all, Kimmee

Raymond Diamond as he looked when he drove the bus...